Date with Destiny

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This will take time (excuse the pun).  'Date with destiny' is a calendar of dates and events, with an on-line hyperlink to a website covering the subject. I will try and cover every day between Jan 1st--dec 31st, so there is something for anyone trying to write fillers or short articles. Please bare with me as it develops. 

If you can supply any dates, with relevant hyperlinks, I'll be extremely grateful for the details.

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January Jaunts

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janJanus kept the gate of Heaven, so he became the god of doors and gates. He was very important, because a house is only as strong as its doors.

His temple in Rome had its doors thrown open in times of War, and closed in times of Peace. They were usually open! The Emperor Augustus closed the doors of the temple, since he brought peace to the Roman Empire.  Janus had two faces, one looking forwards and one looking back since a door can let you in, or let you out. The first month of the year is named after him. In January, we look back at the last year and forward to the next.

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February Fixtures

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febpicThe word February comes from the Roman festival of purification called Februa where people were ritually washed. There is a Roman god called Februus, but he is named after the festival, not the other way around. Other months, like January, are named after Roman gods.

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March Madness

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marchpicThe name of March comes from Latin Martius, the first month of the earliest Roman calendar. It was named for Mars, the Roman god of war who was also regarded as a guardian of agriculture and an ancestor of the Roman people through his sons Romulus and Remus. His month Martius was the beginning of the season for both farming and warfare.

The Dragon in the picture is from the national flag of Wales. 

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April Anecdotes

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AprilThe Romans gave this month the Latin name Aprilis but the derivation of this name is uncertain. The traditional etymology is from the verb aperire, "to open", in allusion to its being the season when trees and flowers begin to "open". Since some of the Roman months were named in honor of divinities, and as April was sacred to the goddess Venus, it has been suggested that Aprilis was originally her month Aphrilis, from her equivalent Greek goddess name Aphrodite (Aphros), or from the Etruscan name Apru.

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May Musings

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mayThe month May was named for the Greek goddess Maia, who was identified with the Roman era goddess of fertility, Bona Dea, whose festival was held in May. Conversely, the Roman poet Ovid provides a second etymology, in which he says that the month of May is named for the maiores, Latin for "elders," and that the following month (June) is named for the iuniores, or "young people"

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June Jottings

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junepicThe Latin name for June is Junius. Ovid offers multiple etymologies for the name.

The first is that the month is named after the Roman goddess Juno, the goddess of marriage and the wife of the supreme deity Jupiter; the second is that the name comes from the Latin word iuniores, meaning "younger ones", as opposed to maiores ("elders") for which the preceding month May (Maius) may be named. In Iceland, folklore says that if you bathe naked in the morning dew on the morning of June 24, you are supposed to keep ageing at bay for longer.
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July Junkets

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julypicJuly is the seventh month of the year (between June and August) in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and one of seven months with the length of 31 days.  It was named by the Roman Senate in honor of the Roman general, Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis.

It is, on average, the warmest month in most of the Northern hemisphere (where it is the second month of summer) and the coldest month in much of the Southern hemisphere (where it is the second month of winter). The second half of the year commences in July. In the Southern hemisphere, July is the seasonal equivalent of January in the Northern hemisphere.

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August; August

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august1This month was originally named Sextili in Latin, because it was the sixth month in the original ten-month Roman calendar under Romulus in 753 BC, when March was the first month of the year.
About 700 BC it became the eighth month when January and February were added to the year before March by King Numa Pompilius, who also gave it 29 days. Julius Caesar added two days when he created the Julian calendar in 45 BC giving it its modern length of 31 days.
In 8 BC it was renamed in honor of Augustus (despite common belief, he did not take a day from February). According to a Senatus consultum quoted by Macrobius, he chose this month because it was the time of several of his great triumphs, including the conquest of Egypt.
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September Sojurns

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septemberSeptember (from Latin septem, "seven") was originally the seventh of ten months on the oldest known Roman calendar, with March (Latin Martius) the first month of the year until perhaps as late as 153 BC.  After the calendar reform that added January and February to the beginning of the year, September became the ninth month but retained its name. It had 29 days until the Julian reform, which added a day.
September is the sixth month of the astrological calendar, which begins at the end of March/Mars/Aries. September also marks the beginning of the ecclesiastical year in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
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October Oddities

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octoberOctober is the tenth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and one of seven months with a length of 31 days. The eighth month in the old Roman calendar, October retained its name (from the Latin "octo" meaning "eight") after January and February were inserted into the calendar that had originally been created by the Romans.

October is commonly associated with the season of autumn in the Northern hemisphere and spring in the Southern hemisphere, where it is the seasonal equivalent to April in the Northern hemisphere and vice versa. It is also very commonly associated with Halloween in the western world.

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November Notices

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novpicNovember is the eleventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and one of four months with the length of 30 days. November was the ninth month of the ancient Roman calendar.
November retained its name (from the Latin novem meaning "nine") when January and February were added to the Roman calendar. November is a month of spring in the Southern Hemisphere and autumn in the Northern Hemisphere.
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December Dates

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decpicDecember was originally the tenth month of the year in the Roman calendar until a monthless winter period was divided between January and February. It gets its name from the Latin word "decem" which means ten. However, when the Romans added January and February to the calendar, it became the twelfth month. The name remained the same.

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